Belief in the Eucharist

 And he took bread, and when he had given thanks he broke it and gave it to them saying, "This is my body which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me." And likewise, the cup after supper, saying, "This cup which is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood."

(Luke 22:19-20)

 

St. John Chrysostom declares:  "It is not man that causes the things offered to become the Body and Blood of Christ, but he who was crucified for us, Christ himself. The priest, in the role of Christ, pronounces these words, but their power and grace are God's. This is my body, he says. This word transforms the things offered."

 

St. Ambrose says:  "Be convinced that this is not what nature has formed, but what the blessing has consecrated. The power of the blessing prevails over that of nature, because by the blessing nature itself is changed. . . . Could not Christ's word, which can make from nothing what did not exist, change existing things into what they were not before? It is no less a feat to give things their original nature than to change their nature."

(Catechism of the Catholic Church #1375)

Jesus Christ, Our Lord

truly present in the

Blessed Sacrament of the Altar

 

Portrait of Our Lord Blessed Sacrament

 

 

From Saint Ignatius of Antioch to Saint Augustine, from Saint Anthony Abbot to Saint Benedict, from Saint Francis of Assisi to Saint Thomas Aquinas, from Saint Clare of Assisi to Saint Catherine of Siena, from Saint Paschal Baylon to Saint Peter Julian Eymard, from Saint Alphonsus Liguori to Blessed Charles de Foucauld, from Saint John Mary Vianney to Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, from Saint Pius of Pietrelcina to Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, from Blessed Piergiorgio Frassati to Blessed Ivan Merz, to name only a few, holiness has always found its centre in the sacrament of the Eucharist.

Pope Benedict XVI, Sacramentum Caritatis, February 22, 2007

 




Worship of the Eucharist

In the liturgy of the Mass we express our faith in the real presence of Christ under the species of bread and wine by, among other ways, genuflecting or bowing deeply as a sign of adoration of the Lord. "The Catholic Church has always offered and still offers to the sacrament of the Eucharist the cult of adoration, not only during Mass, but also outside of it, reserving the consecrated hosts with the utmost care, exposing them to the solemn veneration of the faithful, and carrying them in procession."

 

(Catechism of the Catholic Church #1378)


The Council of Trent summarizes the Catholic faith by declaring: "Because Christ our Redeemer said that it was truly his body that he was offering under the species of bread, it has always been the conviction of the Church of God, and this holy Council now declares again, that by the consecration of the bread and wine there takes place a change of the whole substance of the bread into the substance of the body of Christ our Lord and the wine into the substance of his blood. This change the holy Catholic Church has fittingly and properly called transubstantiation."

(Catechism of the Catholic Church #1376)



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THE PORTRAIT OF OUR LORD IS A UNIQUELY CATHOLIC WORK OF EUCHARISTIC ART, THE FRUIT OF MANY YEARS OF EUCHARISTIC ADORATION, TESTIFYING TO THE REAL PRESENCE OF OUR LORD, JESUS CHRIST, IN THE BLESSED SACRAMENT OF THE HOLY CATHOLIC CHURCH.

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